GAME DAY Youth Sports Magazine Upstate SC - February 2012 : Page 27

sPoRts inJURies 101 Treatment & prevention: The name of the game By STEVEN B. SINGLETON, MD, FACS Village OrthOpaedic Surgery W hether it’s running, ten-nis, golf, bicycling or even a weekend basketball game, there’s always a risk of injury. However, most sports injuries can be treated effectively. But even better, many sports injuries can be prevented if people take the proper precautions. Poor training practices, improper equipment, lack of conditioning, or insuf-ficient warm-up and stretching are popular culprits. Although virtually any part of your body can be injured during sports or exercise, the term sports injury is usually re-served for injuries that involve the musculo-skeletal system, which includes the muscles, bones and associated tissues like cartilage. requires medical treatment. There is never a good reason to try to “work through” the pain of an injury. When you have pain from a particular movement or activity, STOP! Continuing the activity may only cause further harm. You should call a health professional if: The injury causes severe pain, swelling or numbness You can’t tolerate any weight on the area The pain or dull ache of an old injury is accompanied by increased swelling or joint instability If you don’t have any of the above symp-toms, it’s probably safe to treat the injury at home—at least at first. Use the RICE method to relieve pain and inflammation and speed healing. Common types of sports injuries: u Sprains and strains u Tears of the ligaments that hold joints together u Tears of the tendons that support joints and allow them to move u Dislocated joints u Fractured bones, including vertebrae A sprain is a stretch or tear of a liga-ment, the band of connective tissues that joins the end of one bone with another. A strain is a twist, pull, or tear of a muscle or tendon, a cord of tissue connect-ing muscle to bone. It is an acute, noncon-tact injury that results from overstretching or overcontraction. Because of its complex structure and weight-bearing capacity, the knee is the most commonly injured joint. Each year, more than 5.5 million people visit orthopae-dic surgeons for knee problems. While the term shin splints has been widely used to describe any sort of leg pain associated with exercise, the term actually refers to pain along the tibia or shin bone. Shin splints are primarily seen in run-ners, particularly those just starting a run-ning program. Risk factors for shin splints include overuse or incorrect use of the lower leg; improper stretching, warm-up or exercise technique; overtraining; running or jumping on hard surfaces; and running in shoes that don’t have enough support. DR. STEvEN B. SINGLETON A stretch, tear or irritation to the Achil-les tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the back of the heel, can be sudden and agonizing. The most common cause of Achilles tendon tears is a problem called tendinitis, a degenerative condition caused by aging or overuse. When a tendon is weakened, trauma can cause it to rupture. Achilles tendon injuries are common in middle-aged “weekend warriors” who may not exercise regularly or take time to stretch properly before an activity. A fracture is a break in the bone that can occur from either a quick, one-time injury to the bone (acute fracture) or from repeated stress to the bone over time (stress fracture). The most common symptom of a stress fracture is pain at the site that worsens with weight-bearing activity. Tenderness and swelling often accompany the pain. When the two bones that come together to form a joint become separated, the joint is described as being dislocated. Contact sports such as football and basketball, as well as high-impact sports and sports that can result in excessive stretching or falling, cause a majority of dislocations. A dislo-cated joint is an emergency situation that Follow these four steps immediately after injury and continue for at least 48 hours: Rest —Reduce regular exercise or activi-ties of daily living as needed. ice —Apply an ice pack to the injured area for 20 minutes at a time, four to eight times a day. compression —Compression of the injured area may help reduce swelling. Compression can be achieved with elastic wraps, special boots, air casts and splints. elevation —If possible, keep the injured ankle, knee, elbow or wrist elevated on a pillow, above the level of the heart to help decrease swelling. Depending on your preference and the severity of your injury or the likelihood that your injury may cause ongoing, long-term problems, you may want to see or have your primary healthcare professional refer you to one of the following: orthopaedic surgeon: A doctor special-izing in the diagnosis and treatment of the musculoskeletal system, which includes bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles and nerves. Physical therapist: A healthcare profes-sional who can develop a rehabilitation program. Your primary care physician may refer you to a physical therapist after you begin to recover from your injury to help strengthen muscles and joints and prevent further injury. GD For more information, visit www.villageatpelham.com.

SPORTS INJURIES 101

Steven B. Singleton

<br /> Treatment & prevention: The name of the game<br /> <br /> Whether it’s running, tennis, golf, bicycling or even a weekend basketball game, there’s always a risk of injury. However, most sports injuries can be treated effectively. But even better, many sports injuries can be prevented if people take the proper precautions.<br /> <br /> Poor training practices, improper equipment, lack of conditioning, or insufficient warm-up and stretching are popular culprits.<br /> <br /> Although virtually any part of your body can be injured during sports or exercise, the term sports injury is usually reserved for injuries that involve the musculoskeletal system, which includes the muscles, bones and associated tissues like cartilage.<br /> <br /> Common types of sports injuries:<br /> • Sprains and strains<br /> • Tears of the ligaments that hold joints together<br /> • Tears of the tendons that support joints and allow them to move<br /> • Dislocated joints<br /> Fractured bones, including vertebrae<br /> <br /> A sprain is a stretch or tear of a ligament, the band of connective tissues that joins the end of one bone with another.<br /> <br /> A strain is a twist, pull, or tear of a muscle or tendon, a cord of tissue connecting muscle to bone. It is an acute, noncontact injury that results from overstretching or overcontraction.<br /> <br /> Because of its complex structure and weight-bearing capacity, the knee is the most commonly injured joint. Each year, more than 5.5 million people visit orthopaedic surgeons for knee problems.<br /> <br /> While the term shin splints has been widely used to describe any sort of leg pain associated with exercise, the term actually refers to pain along the tibia or shin bone.<br /> <br /> Shin splints are primarily seen in runners, particularly those just starting a running program. Risk factors for shin splints include overuse or incorrect use of the lower leg; improper stretching, warm-up or exercise technique; overtraining; running or jumping on hard surfaces; and running in shoes that don’t have enough support.<br /> <br /> A stretch, tear or irritation to the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the back of the heel, can be sudden and agonizing.<br /> <br /> The most common cause of Achilles tendon tears is a problem called tendinitis, a degenerative condition caused by aging or overuse. When a tendon is weakened, trauma can cause it to rupture.<br /> <br /> Achilles tendon injuries are common in middle-aged “weekend warriors” who may not exercise regularly or take time to stretch properly before an activity.<br /> <br /> A fracture is a break in the bone that can occur from either a quick, one-time injury to the bone (acute fracture) or from repeated stress to the bone over time (stress fracture).<br /> <br /> The most common symptom of a stress fracture is pain at the site that worsens with weight-bearing activity. Tenderness and swelling often accompany the pain.<br /> <br /> When the two bones that come together to form a joint become separated, the joint is described as being dislocated. Contact sports such as football and basketball, as well as high-impact sports and sports that can result in excessive stretching or falling, cause a majority of dislocations. A dislocated joint is an emergency situation that requires medical treatment.<br /> <br /> There is never a good reason to try to “work through” the pain of an injury. When you have pain from a particular movement or activity, STOP! Continuing the activity may only cause further harm.<br /> <br /> You should call a health professional if:<br /> The injury causes severe pain, swelling or numbness<br /> <br /> You can’t tolerate any weight on the area The pain or dull ache of an old injury is accompanied by increased swelling or joint instability<br /> <br /> If you don’t have any of the above symptoms, it’s probably safe to treat the injury at home—at least at first.<br /> <br /> Use the RICE method to relieve pain and inflammation and speed healing.<br /> <br /> Follow these four steps immediately after injury and continue for at least 48 hours:<br /> <br /> Rest—Reduce regular exercise or activities of daily living as needed.<br /> <br /> Ice—Apply an ice pack to the injured area for 20 minutes at a time, four to eight times a day.<br /> <br /> Compression—Compression of the injured area may help reduce swelling. Compression can be achieved with elastic wraps, special boots, air casts and splints.<br /> <br /> Elevation—If possible, keep the injured ankle, knee, elbow or wrist elevated on a pillow, above the level of the heart to help decrease swelling.<br /> <br /> Depending on your preference and the severity of your injury or the likelihood that your injury may cause ongoing, long-term problems, you may want to see or have your primary healthcare professional refer you to one of the following:<br /> <br /> Orthopaedic surgeon: A doctor specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of the musculoskeletal system, which includes bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles and nerves. <br /> <br /> Physical therapist: A healthcare professional who can develop a rehabilitation program. Your primary care physician may refer you to a physical therapist after you begin to recover from your injury to help strengthen muscles and joints and prevent further injury.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here